Bursting the jobs numbers bubble

Well, I really don’t want to burst anyone’s bubble. After all, when I get good news, the last thing I want is to see another episode of Adam Ruins Everything and suddenly what I thought was great news is only going to be marginally beneficial … maybe. Before I get started, though, I want one thing to be crystal clear: I am not an economic wizard. As a matter of fact, I don’t want anyone to think I am even slightly good with economics, especially on a national scale. But I don’t think I have to be; common sense should be enough.

Since before President Trump’s inauguration, he has been making deals. What started with Carrier back in late November, 2016, with the “saving of 1000 jobs” as it was reported, jobs numbers have been on a positive move. As an aside, the NYSE and other markets began a steady trend upward on November 9, 2016 that has continued a generally positive movement. Things look good and we are not yet tired of winning. Right? Let’s analyze what over 1 million newly added and filled jobs means.

First, I really hope for the best and for these jobs (and the markets) to continue the positive growth. The recent proposal to immigration in favor of American workers will certainly help growth, both in jobs and the economy. Bringing talented individuals to partake in the American dream is something we all embrace. Innovation and work is good for them, for us, for America and ultimately for the world. First, however, the immigration bill, or RAISE Act, must become an actual piece of legislation; second to be voted on and, third, signed into law. Expect a lot of push-back from the Democratic Liberals on why this legislation is bad: its racist, Islamophobic and “too cosmopolitan” for the globalist elites, are my guesses. I expect 6 months or more before the RAISE Act is actual law and, most likely, part of a larger immigration reform package.

Since January, 2017 the jobs numbers have surged. Not small numbers, massive numbers that, frankly, the Democrats probably find disappointing because they haven’t been able to achieve these growth rates in … well, decades. And President Trump has only been in office for 6 months. Obama’s 1st year in office witnessed the loss of 5 million jobs. In October, 2010, we saw those numbers begin to return with an additional 5 million over his tenure for a total of 10 million. That is roughly 1.67 million jobs per year, from October, 2010 through October, 2016. At this rate, under Trump’s watch, he should be able to easily match if not surpass Obama’s numbers.

The big difference is that Trump didn’t have to make up for lost ground. He started his tenure in office gaining jobs. Now, I’m not discussing whether or not Trump can actually be credited with the gains. Frankly, I don’t care who gets the credit. The problem is that the gains for the American worker, as it stands now, will be minimal. Sure, we feel better when we are working and earning our way, providing for our family and able to make a vacation or two at some point in our lives. But we still have massive issues that are, quite simply, going to erode any good these jobs numbers project.

There are two glaring problems that the Gutless Old Party has yet to accomplish: 1) tax reform, and 2) repeal of Obamacare.

We still need tax reform. If we want corporate America to succeed, they need incentive – taxes and repatriation are two items that must be addressed. For the individual, so what if I have a job. I’m still paying exorbitant taxes. I have been promised tax reform and I want to see it before the 2018 filing season. Oh, and by the way, it would be beneficial to anyone wanting to keep their job on Capitol Hill to make tax reform retroactive to January 1, 2017.

We still have Obamacare. This piece of legislative and regulatory disaster has been most responsible for inhibiting growth in the public and especially the private sectors. Are we still going to have the IRS looking over our shoulders to make sure we have that burden securely fastened to our backs? Am I still going to be fined a penalty if I don’t have Obamacare?

And, finally, what really grinds my gears (thanks, Peter, for that) is that our Republican President says we need an addition $50 billion in this year’s debt ceiling and “we will reduce that to $30 billion next year.” Wait. What? I thought we were trying to limit government spending. Am I going to be able to go to the grocery store and tell them I have opted for an increased debt ceiling? No. And don’t give me this “reduce to $30 billion.” You aren’t reducing anything. You are increasing the debt ceiling by $80 billion over 2 years. And do you think I am naïve enough to believe that it will stop there?

All these jobs are necessary. We have the government’s subsistence to upkeep and that popping sound you heard was the button on the Fed’s fat pants. Yes, once again, our “conservative” Republicans in Congress are just as liberal with our tax dollars as the Democratic Liberals. The difference is who gets to be in control of the purse and spend the money. What is obvious is that two Liberal parties exist. They simply have different ways they want to spend our money.

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